Golf season is coming. Are you up to par?

February 15, 2016 | by Carol Teteak, M.S.
Categories: Healthy Driven Life
The seasons will soon be changing – but will you be ready to hit the golf course?

You may only need to shake the dust off your clubs before the first round, but your body needs a bit more preparation to withstand the rigors of this sport. To help reduce the risk of injury and improve performance on and off the course, think SMART… an acronym I use for stability, mobility and reactive training. 

Swing into action by incorporating these elements into your weekly routine now:

S is for Stability

Wouldn’t you like better control during all phases of your golf swing? Improving stabilization through a variety of golf-related strength exercises can help sharpen movement throughout the body. Begin with body weight or light-to-moderate loads, moving slowly through the intended range of motion. Exercises should be performed in multiple planes of motion and involve multiple joints when possible. Try alternating lunges with rotation or a squat with single arm, overhead shoulder press.

M is for Mobility

Mobility is range of motion at a joint, or more specifically, movement. When we consider the golf swing, we want limited restrictions in the ankle, hip, thoracic spine and shoulder complex. Performing flexibility exercises that target these areas can help improve swing range. Choose dynamic stretches and targeted foam rolling prior to exercise or a game, then static stretches and extended foam rolling afterwards. Seeking a more concentrated effort with additional benefits of relaxation? Try adding yoga on a weekly basis.

R is for Reactive

These types of exercises help the mind and body work more efficiently together. Also called neuromuscular training, balance, agility, coordination and power-based exercises can allow greater function and power throughout the golf swing as well as: 
• Help maintain our center of gravity 
• Improve how we react to outside influences 
• Make movement easier and more proficient

T is for Training

Sport-related conditioning (whether weekend warrior, amateur or professional) requires discipline, a willingness to fail, an eagerness to learn, and a progressive program that fits the needs of the player.

Your body requires an appropriate combination of the above, along with regular aerobic training, to improve or maintain one’s fitness level.

Unsure what your body needs, where to start or how to create a safe and effective golf conditioning routine with proper execution? Try our GolfSMART Small Group Personal Training class or contact me at 630-646-7900 about working with one of our Titleist Performance Institute golf conditioning specialists.

Learn more about Edward-Elmhurst Health & Fitness Centers.

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